JULY, 2021

HERITAGE MUSIC REVIEW

ELECTRONIC EDITION: Now free to email subscribers and supported by tasteful, music-oriented advertising with a unique news-format approach.

A monthly guide to early rock, blues, country, folk, and traditional jazz in the Seattle area and beyond.

Editor and Publisher: Doug Bright

Email: subscribe@heritagemusicreview.com

CONTENTS—JULY, 2021

THE GRAMMYS: A ROOTS MUSIC REPORT

part 1: Traditional Jazz and Vintage Pop

WHAT'S IN STORE: News From The Musical Marketplace

CHECKIN, OUT THE SOUNDS: JULY MUSIC CALENDAR ――――――――――

THE GRAMMYS: A ROOTS MUSIC REPORT

part 1: Traditional Jazz and Vintage Pop

By Doug Bright

In 1958 the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences established an annual award to honor the record industry's highest creative achievements in a wide range of musical styles. There were 28 award categories then, but as the years passed and the music industry became increasingly specialized, so did the awards. Today, 63 years later, there are 83 categories, and this year's awards shed interesting light on the strength and scope of American traditional music in the recording industry. The following developments will be of particular interest to readers of Heritage Music Review.

Traditional Jazz and Vintage Pop

It was 1990 when 21-year-old Harry Connick Jr. burst into the national spotlight, following up his musical contribution to the blockbuster film "When Harry Met Sally" with an album of original songs with big-band arrangements in the best Sinatra tradition called _We Are In _Love.

Thirty years later, his triumphant return to that time-honored formula earned him a Grammy nomination once again for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album. This release, marking his debut on the historic Verve label, is entitled _True _Love: A Celebration of Cole Porter.

While most classic pop crooners, both past and present, have delegated everything but the lead vocal tracks to others, Connick has once more opted to write the orchestrations and lead the band himself, and the genius that characterized his initial effort is just as evident here. The opening track, a briskly swinging revival of Porter's commentary on the original Roaring Twenties, "Anything Goes",

feels eerily prophetic today and includes a little-known vintage verse. As you might expect, "Just One of Those Things" is similarly paced, and Connick's piano solo features the kind of dense block chords that call Erroll Garner

The C